Abdorrahman Boroumand Center

for Human Rights in Iran

https://www.iranrights.org
Memorial
Omid, a memorial in defense of human rights in Iran
Ramin
Mahmud
Hushang
Emiliano Gaston
Zahra (Tahereh)
Cristian Adrian
Seyed Jalil
Naser
Izzat
Shahriar
Seyed Mohsen
Jamshid
Gholam Reza
Amir
Khaled
25350
victims of state violence are in Omid
One day, each of them was unfairly and arbitrarily deprived of his or her life

Omid Memorial

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The men and women whose stories you can read on this page are now all citizens of a silent city named Omid ("hope" in Persian). There, victims of persecution have found a common life whose substance is memory.

Omid's citizens were of varying social origins, nationalities, and religions; they held diverse, and often opposing, opinions and ideologies. Despite the differences in their personality, spirit, and moral fiber, they are all united in Omid by their natural rights and their humanity. What makes them fellow citizens is the fact that one day each of them was unfairly and arbitrarily deprived of his or her life. At that moment, while the world watched the unspeakable happen, an individual destiny was shattered, a family was destroyed, and an indescribable suffering was inflicted.

Hossein Akbari…

He was a teenager, a student, and one who opposed the election results of 2009.   The hospital he was taken to had been named for Ayatollah Khomeini.

He had written on the independence of judges and the presumption of innocence and was ready to defend himself, if tried. In Revolutionary Courts, however, defendants were presumed guilty and judges mandated to kill.
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Gholam Hossein Ahrabi…

Earlier, Gholam Hossein Ahrabi learned Physics and lived in Europe for a time.  When the Ranjbaran Party formed in Iran, he became a valuable member.

He had written on the independence of judges and the presumption of innocence and was ready to defend himself, if tried. In Revolutionary Courts, however, defendants were presumed guilty and judges mandated to kill.
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Ja'far Savari…

Mr. Savari was a building electrician and was preparing to continue his education at the college level. One of his dreams was to have a car.

He had written on the independence of judges and the presumption of innocence and was ready to defend himself, if tried. In Revolutionary Courts, however, defendants were presumed guilty and judges mandated to kill.
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